1930 3.0 litre Special Lagonda T1 open tourer.

Lagonda 3.0 Litre Special T1 Tourer

Year: 1930
Chassis no: 9717
Registration: KF 5369
Price: £SOLD

1930 3.0 litre Special Lagonda T1 open tourer.

Chassis number: 9717

Registration number: KF5369

This particular Lagonda is a desirable low chassis tourer model with original Weymann-style fabric covered bodywork & moving cycle style wings. Importantly it was built as a "Special Model", with the designation S in the type numbet.  The S designation included increased cooling with the radiator core dipping down to either side of the dynamo housin & having two drain taps rather then the more usual one.  The engine is also a very rare & early six plate model as opposed to the later & more common item with a mere three access plates on the side.

First registered in Liverpool in May 1931, it comes with a large history file going right back to 1938 which indicates that it has had only four owners since that date, the first of these being a Lionel Woodward of York and London. He kept it until 1962 when it was acquired by Saab dealer and Lagonda Club member, Bryan Barton of Long Eaton, from whom a previous owner, Roy Jones acquired it in April 1963 beofre passing to the current onwership.

Jones paid £325 for the car, the original advertisement and purchase invoice describing it as being “in excellent condition throughout and original in every respect” having been previously treated to an engine rebuild and new fabric to the T1 coachwork. However, there was clearly scope for improvement and in 1971 Jones had the car stripped down and the Z-type low chassis was sent to Rubery Owen of Birmingham the following year to be fully restored, rebuilt and zinc sprayed, thus setting in train a steady process of improvement which was to continue for the next four decades.

The extent of the work done to the car in the last 50 year ownership is too detailed to list in full here but is amply documented by many invoices, letters and photographs in the history file. Highlights include an overhaul of the brakes, steering and suspension in 1972; ZE gearbox rebuild in 1986; engine rebuild by Jim Pike of Excel Engineering, Birmingham, in 1987; instruments restored in 1988; various smaller jobs attended to by SE Lloyd of Wolverhampton in 1996.

The brightwork was rechromed in 2008, including the Lucas P100 headlamps which were restored and protected by removable green leather covers embossed with the Lagonda logo. The windscreen was also restored, this being an 11” high style offered by Lagonda for the taller driver. The radiator was rebuilt in 2009 and the car was repainted in 2010 when the wheels were also blasted and powder coated, new tyres fitted along with a new petrol tank and new hood and side screens. The black leather interior is largely original and retains a very pleasing patina.

As you can imagine, Mr Jones had little time in which to enjoy the car during this prolonged restoration, opting to buy another car for vintage motoring while work progressed on the Lagonda, as detailed in correspondence on file. In fact by the time the work was finally completed to his satisfaction, he only managed to cover some 100 miles in the car before he sadly passed away in 2012.

To prepare the car for sale, other family members then handed the car over to the Lagonda Club’s acknowledged authority on the 3-Litre model, John Ryder of Bridgnorth, who thoroughly recommissioned and serviced the car in August and November 2013, attending to any issues identified with bills on file amounting to some £4,300. This has resulted in a clean bill of health with Ryder reporting that: “No obvious faults were apparent and the condition overall is excellent. The quality of the extensive restoration work is exemplary”.

Although the last MOT expired in the summer of 2013 (and a new one is no longer required for a vehicle of this age), the car has been little used since then and remains in good order, starting easily and running well.  The 9717 chassis number indicates that it was built in 1930, this fact being borne out by correspondence in the history file from then VSCC Secretary, TW Carson, that any number below 9780 certifies the car as Vintage, a ruling that will doubtless be accepted by the current eligibility committee. Altogether a lovely example of this most desirable of Lagonda models that is ready to embark on the next chapter of its 87-year life to date.

We will be taking extensive pictures of the car upon arrival with us in the next few weeks.

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Vehicle details

Additional Information / Service History

1930 3.0 litre Special Lagonda T1 open tourer.

Chassis number: 9717

Registration number: KF5369

This particular Lagonda is a desirable low chassis tourer model with original Weymann-style fabric covered bodywork & moving cycle style wings. Importantly it was built as a "Special Model", with the designation S in the type numbet.  The S designation included increased cooling with the radiator core dipping down to either side of the dynamo housin & having two drain taps rather then the more usual one.  The engine is also a very rare & early six plate model as opposed to the later & more common item with a mere three access plates on the side.

First registered in Liverpool in May 1931, it comes with a large history file going right back to 1938 which indicates that it has had only four owners since that date, the first of these being a Lionel Woodward of York and London. He kept it until 1962 when it was acquired by Saab dealer and Lagonda Club member, Bryan Barton of Long Eaton, from whom a previous owner, Roy Jones acquired it in April 1963 beofre passing to the current onwership.

Jones paid £325 for the car, the original advertisement and purchase invoice describing it as being “in excellent condition throughout and original in every respect” having been previously treated to an engine rebuild and new fabric to the T1 coachwork. However, there was clearly scope for improvement and in 1971 Jones had the car stripped down and the Z-type low chassis was sent to Rubery Owen of Birmingham the following year to be fully restored, rebuilt and zinc sprayed, thus setting in train a steady process of improvement which was to continue for the next four decades.

The extent of the work done to the car in the last 50 year ownership is too detailed to list in full here but is amply documented by many invoices, letters and photographs in the history file. Highlights include an overhaul of the brakes, steering and suspension in 1972; ZE gearbox rebuild in 1986; engine rebuild by Jim Pike of Excel Engineering, Birmingham, in 1987; instruments restored in 1988; various smaller jobs attended to by SE Lloyd of Wolverhampton in 1996.

The brightwork was rechromed in 2008, including the Lucas P100 headlamps which were restored and protected by removable green leather covers embossed with the Lagonda logo. The windscreen was also restored, this being an 11” high style offered by Lagonda for the taller driver. The radiator was rebuilt in 2009 and the car was repainted in 2010 when the wheels were also blasted and powder coated, new tyres fitted along with a new petrol tank and new hood and side screens. The black leather interior is largely original and retains a very pleasing patina.

As you can imagine, Mr Jones had little time in which to enjoy the car during this prolonged restoration, opting to buy another car for vintage motoring while work progressed on the Lagonda, as detailed in correspondence on file. In fact by the time the work was finally completed to his satisfaction, he only managed to cover some 100 miles in the car before he sadly passed away in 2012.

To prepare the car for sale, other family members then handed the car over to the Lagonda Club’s acknowledged authority on the 3-Litre model, John Ryder of Bridgnorth, who thoroughly recommissioned and serviced the car in August and November 2013, attending to any issues identified with bills on file amounting to some £4,300. This has resulted in a clean bill of health with Ryder reporting that: “No obvious faults were apparent and the condition overall is excellent. The quality of the extensive restoration work is exemplary”.

Although the last MOT expired in the summer of 2013 (and a new one is no longer required for a vehicle of this age), the car has been little used since then and remains in good order, starting easily and running well.  The 9717 chassis number indicates that it was built in 1930, this fact being borne out by correspondence in the history file from then VSCC Secretary, TW Carson, that any number below 9780 certifies the car as Vintage, a ruling that will doubtless be accepted by the current eligibility committee. Altogether a lovely example of this most desirable of Lagonda models that is ready to embark on the next chapter of its 87-year life to date.

We will be taking extensive pictures of the car upon arrival with us in the next few weeks.

Back to sales vehicles

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